Review: Frankenstein – Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Frankenstein – Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Frankenstein

Title: Frankenstein

Author: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Release Date: October 21, 1994 – originally: 1818

Publisher: Dover Publications

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 166

Source: Foundations of the English Major Class

Mary Shelley began writing Frankenstein when she was only eighteen. At once a Gothic thriller, a passionate romance, and a cautionary tale about the dangers of science, Frankenstein tells the story of committed science student Victor Frankenstein. Obsessed with discovering the cause of generation and life and bestowing animation upon lifeless matter, Frankenstein assembles a human being from stolen body parts but; upon bringing it to life, he recoils in horror at the creature’s hideousness. Tormented by isolation and loneliness, the once-innocent creature turns to evil and unleashes a campaign of murderous revenge against his creator, Frankenstein.

Frankenstein, an instant bestseller and an important ancestor of both the horror and science fiction genres, not only tells a terrifying story, but also raises profound, disturbing questions about the very nature of life and the place of humankind within the cosmos: What does it mean to be human? What responsibilities do we have to each other? How far can we go in tampering with Nature? In our age, filled with news of organ donation genetic engineering, and bio-terrorism, these questions are more relevant than ever.

4 out of 5 stars


I read this for my Foundations of the English Major class and I was pleasantly surprised, but I still didn’t love it.

The synopsis of this book explains everything so I’m not going to go into detail, but I liked the framing of this story. It started off with letters from a captain of a ship to his sister and Frankenstein’s story is told by him in his letters. I’m not going to lie, I was kind of shocked when I found out how the letters connected with the story.

I don’t know if this was just me being clueless, but I thought the creature/monster was named Frankenstein. Nope. The man who creates the monster is Frankenstein and the monster doesn’t get named. This is apparently a big deal, should probably learn a little more about why that is before I write my essay over this book… ha.

This book took me forever to read. I read it when it was assigned, but it just went so slowly. There were so many words on each page in the edition I have and omg it was dragging on and on and on. I listened to an audiobook I found on YouTube while reading through it.

I annotated this and there’s honestly nothing better than flipping through an annotated book. #englishmajorlife It’s so cool seeing what you thought was important while going through it. Love it.

Yeah, I don’t want to talk a ton about this because I do have to write a paper on it (ugh why tho). I would recommend this, but only if you’re going to be talking about it in a class. It’s hella boring if you aren’t.

2 thoughts on “Review: Frankenstein – Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

  1. I read this a couple of weeks ago for uni as well and I was pleasantly surprised! I enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would. (I also thought the creature was called Frankenstein😂). Great post!

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