Tag Archives: poetry review

REREAD Milk and Honey – Rupi Kaur


Milk and Honey – Rupi Kaur

Milk and Honey

Title: Milk and Honey

Author: Rupi Kaur

Release Date: November 4, 2014

Publisher: Createspace

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 204

Source: Walmart

milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. milk and honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

4 out of 5 stars


Oh little naive 2017 Aubrey.

I originally read this book before my painful breakup. Before I realized I was in an unhealthy relationship. Before I admitted to myself that I wasn’t happy. I didn’t understand then how beautiful and true these feelings were.

When I originally reviewed this I rated it 2 stars because I didn’t connect with any of it. I didn’t understand. I actually read part of it on my then boyfriend’s front porch. I was just naive. But that’s okay because everyone is supposed to have a point of naivety in their life, mine just lasted a little longer than it probably should have.

This book touched me and reached me so differently than the first time. I don’t really know why I was drawn to reading it for a second time because I didn’t enjoy it the first time, but I’m so glad I picked it up. I strongly believe that people won’t enjoy this unless they’ve experienced a painful heartbreak. Even if it’s you breaking up with a significant other, it’s still painful.

I know that maturity made me love this book. I now see why people love it so much.

Rupi Kaur writes about four different stages in her life: the hurting, the loving, the breaking, and the healing. The book is split into these four sections and takes a different tone for each. I related to the sections “the loving” and “the breaking” the most, but still appreciated the others.

The prose is beautifully written and easy to consume. The stories are tragic and true.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVo4q6xsWNc

Some of my favorite poems/quotes:

what i miss most is how you loved me. but what i didn’t know was how you loved me had so much to do with the person i was. it was a reflection of everything I gave to you. coming back to me. how did i not see that. how. did i sit here soaking in the idea that no one else would love me that way. when it was i that taught you. when it was i that showed you how to fill. the way i needed to be filled. how cruel i was to myself. giving you credit for my warmth simply because you had felt it. thinking it was you who gave me strength. wit. beauty. simply because you recognized it. as if i was already not these things before i met you. as if i did not remain all these once you left.

 

losing you was

the becoming

of myself

 

most importantly love

like it’s the only thing you know how

at the end of the day all this

means nothing

this page

where you’re sitting

your degree

your job

the money

nothing even matters

except love and human connection

who you loved

and how deeply you loved them

how you touched the people around you

and how much you gave them

Aubrey Joy

Review: Goblin Market and Other Poems – Christina Rossetti


Goblin Market and Other Poems – Christina Rossetti

Goblin Market and Other Poems

Title: Goblin Market and Other Poems

Author: Christina Rossetti

Release Date: March 5, 2012 – originally: 1862

Publisher: Dover Publications

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 68

Source: Foundations of the English Major Class

Features 32 works — among them “The Convent Threshold,” “Up-hill,” “Cousin Kate,” “Winter: My Secret,” “Maude Clare,” and celebrated title poem.

3 out of 5 stars


This wasn’t what I was expecting. The title poem suggests mischief and magical creatures, and yes the goblins were that but I thought there would be more.

I think the first poem was the only one with a fantasy element which was very disappointing to me. I LOVE fantasy obviously if you’ve seen a lot of the books I read, so when you go in expecting that and get only tragic poems about death and despair it throws you for a loop a little bit.

That being said, the poems were beautiful. I will say that. There’s a reason Christina Rossetti is known for “Goblin Market” because the poem was beautifully written. But I found myself getting lost in the poems! Let me explain a little more.

These are short poems; most of them were only a few stanzas, but the wording was almost too flowery for me to understand. I think this is a time period situation because a lot of the other literature I’ve read from around this time is very similar in the sense that the descriptions are very in depth and the word choice is a little over my head at times. I kept getting lost in the little poems! I would try and focus and pay attention to them, but I think most of the deeper meanings went over my head. This could also be because I read it late at night, but that’s on me.

I think there are worse things to have to read for a class, so I’m happy with this as a required reading. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend this to anyone not interested in literature and poetry because it is hard to understand sometimes.

Review: Guilt in Our Pockets: Poems from South India – Carlos Reyes


Guilt in Our Pockets: Poems from South India – Carlos Reyes

Guilt in Our Pockets: Poems from South India

Title: Guilt in Our Pockets: Poems from South India

Author: Carlos Reyes

Release Date: July 17, 2017

Publisher: Lynx House Press

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 48

Source: Free Book Table!

This new collection by the internationally known poet and translator Carlos Reyes adds to the rich treasure chest of poems from a restless and inveterate traveler whose work has taken us to Spain, Ecuador, France, Ireland, the Arctic, the Galapagos, Mexico, Panama, Italy, and now India. In these poems a talent for visual texture and detail, coupled with the poet’s familiarity with a huge variety of social and cultural matrixes, produces a close and sometimes troubling view of the contrast between American assumptions of privilege and India’s blend of fantastically rich culture and the bitterly desperate social and economic circumstances to be found there in the lives of common folk.

2 out of 5 stars


I found this book while looking through a stack of books on a free book table in one of the English buildings on campus. I was intrigued because I’ve never read any poetry from India, so I brought it with me.

I found this to be a little lackluster for me. I understand that the premise is to show that we, Westerners, are more privileged than those in impoverished countries, but this made me sad pretty much the whole time. Again, I get that that is probably the purpose of this poetry collection, but it was just very sad.

But home is always

where I am at the moment.

This was my favorite quote because I agree with this! Home is wherever you are whether that be with being at college or traveling the world. You can have more than one home.

This didn’t feel like it had a conclusive ending, so it left me hanging a little bit. I wish that the last poem would have wrapped up the collection a little bit more. I also don’t really feel as though I learned that much about South Indian culture while reading this, which is disappointing.

Carlos Reyes sounds like a pretty cool guy. The bio on the back of the book says:

“He lives and writes in Portland, Oregon, when is he not traveling.”

So obviously travel is a huge part of his life, so I think he would be an interesting man to meet!