REREAD Review: City of Glass (The Mortal Instruments #3) – Cassandra Clare


City of Glass (The Mortal Instruments #3) – Cassandra Clare

City of Glass (The Mortal Instruments, #3)

Title: City of Glass (The Mortal Instruments #3)

Author: Cassandra Clare

Release Date: March 4, 2009

Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 541

Source: Barnes and Noble

To save her mother’s life, Clary must travel to the City of Glass, the ancestral home of the Shadowhunters; never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death. To make things worse, she learns that Jace does not want her there, and Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.

As Clary uncovers more about her family’s past, she finds an ally in mysterious Shadowhunter Sebastian. With Valentine mustering the full force of his power to destroy all Shadowhunters forever, their only chance to defeat him is to fight alongside their eternal enemies. But can Downworlders and Shadowhunters put aside their hatred to work together? While Jace realizes exactly how much he’s willing to risk for Clary, can she harness her newfound powers to help save the Glass City – whatever the cost?

5 out of 5 stars


Again, this is a continuation of my reread of this series.

I LOVE THIS SERIES.

These are seriously my favorite books and I love rereading them. I pick up on so many more little things that I missed the times I’ve read these before. I love finding little Easter eggs throughout that make me think about the future books.

This book made me REALLY excited to reread The Dark Artifices series, which will be in a little while because I’m reading them in publication order, but IT’S SO GOOD.

I don’t really have anything productive to say other than to read these books because they’re so dang good.

Series:

City of Bones (The Mortal Instruments #1)

City of Ashes (The Mortal Instruments #2)

Review: Almost Adulting: All You Need to Know to Get It Together (Sort Of) – Arden Rose


Almost Adulting: All You Need to Know to Get It Together (Sort Of) – Arden Rose

Almost Adulting: All You Need to Know to Get It Together (Sort Of)

Title: Almost Adulting: All You Need to Know to Get It Together

Author: Arden Rose

Release Date: March 28, 2017

Publisher: HarperCollins

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 208

Source: Scribd

For fans of Grace Helbig and Alexa Chung comes a fresh, hilarious guide to growing up your way from social media influencer and lifestyle vlogger Arden Rose.

In Almost Adulting — perfect for budding adults, failing adults, and eaters of microwave mug brownies — Arden tells you how to survive your future adulthood. Topics include:

-Making internet friends who are cool and not murderers

-Flirting with someone in a way to make them think you are cool and not a murderer

-Being in an actual relationship where you talk about your feelings in a healthy manner??? To the other person???????

-Eating enough protein

-Assembling a somewhat acceptable adult wardrobe when you have zero dollars

-Going on adventures without starting to smell

-How sex is supposed to feel, but, like, actually though

By the end of the book — a mash-up of essays, lists, and artwork — you’ll have learned not only how to dress yourself, how to travel alone, how to talk to strangers online, and how to date strangers (in PERSON!), but also how to pass as a real, functioning, appropriately socialized adult.

3 out of 5 stars


Almost Adulting by Arden Rose is just a random hodge-podge of events from Arden’s life, but random in a good way.

Arden Rose is a YouTuber who now lives in LA. She’s mastered the art of not caring what people think and being happy about what she’s doing. I think she’s admirable when it comes to how she’s living her life, but there are obviously some things I would do a little differently.

Arden reminds me of my best friend, Kaitlyn, because they’re both a little free-spirit, like having cute vintage things, have a distinct style, and are confident in who they are. I admire Arden even more because she reminds me of Kaitlyn.

I listened to this on audiobook from Scribd, and I really enjoyed hearing Arden narrate this book. It felt like she was letting you in on some secrets from her life. She is very open and honest with everything in this book.

I liked the chapter where she talked about sex and virginity. Her take on it isn’t exactly like mine, but I loved how open she was about the whole conversation. Her idea is that it’s your body, you can do what you want with it. I agree, and I love that she added that you can have sex if you want, but you don’t have to if you don’t want to. She also talked about how important it is to spread positivity when it comes to talking about bodies.

I think this is a great audiobook and I would recommend it to anyone who likes Arden. I think the next time I see this book in a store I’m going to flip through it so I can see some of the artwork, but I’m glad I could listen to Arden read it.

Also. I love the name Arden.

July Wrapup


  1. The Complete Tales – Beatrix Potter
  2. Isla and the Happily Ever After (Anna and the French Kiss #3) – Stephanie Perkins *review*
  3. Legend (Legend #1) – Marie Lu *original review* *reread review*
  4. The Art of the Start 2.0: The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything – Guy Kawasaki
  5. Simple Matters: Living with Less and Ending Up with More – Erin Boyle *review*
  6. Shatter Me (Shatter Me #1) – Tahereh Mafi *review*
  7. Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future – Peter Thiel
  8. Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina – Michaela DePrince *review*
  9. The Thousandth Floor (The Thousandth Floor #1) – Katharine McGee *review*
  10. Experience Psychology – Laura A. King
  11. Prodigy (Legend #2) – Marie Lu *review*
  12. Champion (Legend #3) – Marie Lu *review*

Review: Love & Gelato – Jenna Evans Welch


Love & Gelato – Jenna Evans Welch

Love & Gelato

Title: Love & Gelato

Author: Jenna Evans Welch

Release Date: May 3, 2016

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 389

Source: Public Library

“I made the wrong choice.”

Lina is spending the summer in Tuscany, but she isn’t in the mood for Italy’s famous sunshine and fairy-tale landscape. She’s only there because it was her mother’s dying wish that she get to know her father. But what kind of father isn’t around for sixteen years? All Lina wants to do is get back home.

But then she is given a journal that her mom had kept when she lived in Italy. Suddenly Lina’s uncovering a magical world of secret romances, art, and hidden bakeries. A world that inspires Lina, along with the ever-so-charming Ren, to follow in her mother’s footsteps and unearth a secret that has been kept for far too long. It’s a secret that will change everything she knew about her mother, her father—and even herself.

People come to Italy for love and gelato, someone tells her, but sometimes they discover much more.

5 out of 5 stars


I loved this book so much. I’m just having such great luck with contemporaries lately!

This book followed a girl named Lina who goes to live with a father she’s never met right outside of Florence after her mother dies of cancer. Lina gets to Italy and realizes that she’s going to have to live in a house at a cemetery. It’s a WWII cemetery and is no longer used for new burials, but still. She goes on her daily morning run and meets a boy her age named Ren. They quickly become friends and she starts spending a lot of time with him. In the meantime, one of her father’s friends gives her a journal from her mother during her time living in Italy. She reads through it piece by piece, but the journal becomes an object of mystery. Her mother explains stories about her time in Italy and Lina realizes her father might not be who she thinks he is…

This reminded me so much of my trip to Italy that I took two years ago. The description of travel was so accurate it almost hurt. Lina’s initial response to walking up to the Duomo in Florence was exactly how I felt. It was amazing.

Her first taste of gelato was exactly how I felt. The small adventures were just as important as the big ones. It was the perfect depiction of having new experiences.

Then there’s Ren. Oh my gosh I love him so much. Right away you know that she’s going to fall for him because she HAS to. He’s cute, half-Italian, quirky. He’s perfect. I love them together.

I love her father. He’s so sweet and loves her so much. I love that it’s not a “typical” familial tie but it works so well.

I love that there’s a little mystery when it comes to the journal.

There was just so much to love about this book and it just makes me want to go travel in Italy again!

Review: A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel – Hope Larson and Madeleine L’Engle


A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel – Hope Larson and Madeleine L’Engle

A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel

Title: A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel

Author: Madeleine L’Engle

Release Date: October 2, 2012

Publisher: Margaret Ferguson Books

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 392

Source: Public Library

Late one night, three otherworldly creatures appear and sweep Meg Murry, her brother Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin O’Keefe away on a mission to save Mr. Murry, who has gone missing while doing top-secret work for the government. They travel via tesseract — a wrinkle that transports one across space and time — to the planet Camazotz, where Mr. Murry is being held captive. There they discover a dark force that threatens not only Mr. Murry but the safety of the whole universe.

Never before illustrated, A Wrinkle in Time is now available in a spellbinding graphic novel adaptation. Hope Larson takes the classic story to a new level with her vividly imagined interpretations of Mrs Whatsit, Mrs Who, Mrs Which, the Happy Medium, Aunt Beast, and the many other characters that readers have loved for the past fifty years. Winner of the 1963 Newbery Medal, A Wrinkle in Time is the first book in Madeleine L’Engle’s Time Quintet.

1 out of 5 stars


I read this book for the challenge of ‘read and watch a book to movie adaptation’ for Booktubeathon!

I read the novel of A Wrinkle in Time back at the beginning of this year and didn’t really enjoy it, but was SUPER excited for the movie. For some reason I didn’t go and see the movie when it was out in theatre, so I thought this would be the perfect book to read for this challenge. 

But…. I really did not enjoy this book…. at all.

Firstly, the art style was not the type of art that I like. It just didn’t flow how I thought it should and the characters looked kind of creepy.

Secondly, I would have been SO LOST had I not read the original novel before reading this. I was so confused even though I knew what was supposed to be happening. There was absolutely no cohesion when it came to anything.

Thirdly, the storyline just doesn’t appeal to me. I understand that it’s a children’s book, but it was way too confusing to be a good story. There were so many random things that had nothing to do with anything special.

The only reason I read this was because I’m looking forward to the movie. I still plan on watching the movie, and hopefully I’ll like that better than this.

Review: Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina – Michaela DePrince


Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina – Michaela DePrince

Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina

Title: Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina

Author: Michaela DePrince

Release Date: January 1, 2014

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers

Format: Audiobook

Page Number: 256 pages

The extraordinary memoir of Michaela DePrince, a young dancer who escaped war-torn Sierra Leone for the rarefied heights of American ballet.
Michaela DePrince was known as girl Number 27 at the orphanage, where she was abandoned at a young age and tormented as a “devil child” for a skin condition that makes her skin appear spotted. But it was at the orphanage that Michaela would find a picture of a beautiful ballerina en pointe that would help change the course of her life.
At the age of four, Michaela was adopted by an American family, who encouraged her love of dancing and enrolled her in classes. She went on to study at the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School at the American Ballet Theatre and is currently a member of the Dutch National Ballet’s junior company. She has appeared in the ballet documentary “First Position,” as well as on “Dancing with the Stars, Good Morning America,” and “Nightline.”
In this engaging, moving, and unforgettable memoir, Michaela shares her dramatic journey from an orphan in West Africa to becoming one of ballet’s most exciting rising stars.

4 out of 5 stars


It’s always hard for me to review memoirs because it’s such a personal story, but I really enjoyed this one.

I listened to this book on audio through Scribd (amazing app if you haven’t used it). I think it was really nice to listen to on audiobook because you really felt like you were there with her. I don’t believe she narrated the book, but it was smooth and nice to listen to.

This book follows Michaela DePrince who was born in Sierra Leone to a loving family, but was eventually sent to live at an orphanage after the death of her parents. Her early childhood was hard to read and listen to because I can’t even imagine what it would have been like for her and her sister. Her life was so hard for her before she even knew it was bad. It’s just so terrible that this is happening all over the world.

While at the orphanage she found a magazine photo of a beautiful ballerina from a magazine, and kept it with her. She knew that when she got adopted she wanted to be a dancer. Her life got turned around when she got adopted by the same parents as her best friend in the orphanage. Now the two best friends were becoming sisters.

They got to the United States and had to learn how to adjust to the culture. It was completely different from anything either of the girls had known before. Michaela asked her parents if she could take dance lessons, and her career blossomed from there.

Michaela DePrince is an accomplished ballerina who helped to make a difference in the dance world by showing that black girls can be ballerinas, too. She was in the documentary First Position and danced with Dutch National Ballet.

I, myself, am a dancer so I always love to read about other people’s dance stories. This one was inspiring, and it was beautiful to see Michaela’s passion for dance from the beginning.

Review: Shatter Me (Shatter Me #1) – Tahereh Mafi


Shatter Me (Shatter Me #1) – Tahereh Mafi

Shatter Me (Shatter Me, #1)

Title: Shatter Me (Shatter Me #1)

Author: Tahereh Mafi

Release Date: November 15, 2011

Publisher: Harpercollins

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 338

Juliette hasn’t touched anyone in exactly 264 days.

The last time she did, it was an accident, but The Reestablishment locked her up for murder. No one knows why Juliette’s touch is fatal. As long as she doesn’t hurt anyone else, no one really cares. The world is too busy crumbling to pieces to pay attention to a 17-year-old girl. Diseases are destroying the population, food is hard to find, birds don’t fly anymore, and the clouds are the wrong color.

The Reestablishment said their way was the only way to fix things, so they threw Juliette in a cell. Now so many people are dead that the survivors are whispering war – and The Reestablishment has changed its mind. Maybe Juliette is more than a tortured soul stuffed into a poisonous body. Maybe she’s exactly what they need right now.

Juliette has to make a choice: Be a weapon. Or be a warrior.

3 out of 5 stars


I buddy read this book with Emily from her Booktube channel emibookish!

This is a dystopian novel following a girl named Juliette. She has a power that means she is unable to touch anyone without killing them, or coming close to killing them. She has never been loved. She hasn’t touched anyone or been touched in over three years. Oh, and she’s been in solitary confinement in an insane asylum for 264 days.

I loved the writing style of this book. It was beautiful and poetic and rambly, but it a wonderful way. The words flowed so perfectly that sometimes it felt like I was reading free verse poetry. I honestly think this was the easiest writing style to read!

I’ve always been intrigued by this book, so when Emily asked me to buddy read it with her I said ABSOLUTELY. ps. I LOVE buddy reading. So much fun. Anyway, I have always wanted to read this because it sounded interesting.

But here’s the thing. I’m wonderful at avoiding spoilers/knowing anything about books before I read them. So I really had no idea what this was about, but I knew a lot of people loved it. So I was excited to pick it up, and it was absolutely NOTHING like what I thought it was going to be. Any preconceived notion was wrong.

Not bad wrong, just completely wrong. It’s actually comical how much I had no idea what this book was about.

This was so much darker at the beginning than I was expecting. The book starts out with Juliette in her solitary confinement and she’s pretty much going crazy because she hasn’t seen another human being in 264 days. Then Adam comes and becomes her roommate in her cell. She has no idea why he’s there, but she remembers him. She went to school with him and he is now with her. Alone. In her cell. Where she’s been alone. She doesn’t know how to cope, so she kind of freaks out.

But then the story progresses and Juliette gets taken away and finds out that Adam is a soldier who has been spying on her. INTENSE.

I enjoyed this book, but I do have to admit, the beginning was kind of slow. I’ve heard that the rest of the series is amazing, so I’m definitely going to continue on! I already downloaded the rest of the series onto my Nook…. oops.

I can’t wait to read more from Tahereh Mafi because her writing style was GORGEOUS!