Review: A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet #1) – Madeleine L’Engle


A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet #1) – Madeleine L’Engle

A Wrinkle in Time Movie Tie-In Edition

Title: A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet #1)

Author: Madeleine L’Engle

Release Date: 1962

Publisher: Square Fish

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 256

Source: The Country Bookshop

Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and Calvin O’Keefe (one of the most popular boys in school) journey through time and space in search of Meg’s father, a scientist who disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government on the tesseract problem. What’s a tesseract? It’s a wrinkle in time–but to say any more about the subject would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Madeleine L’Engle’s unusual and enchanting book.

4 out of 5 stars


Middle grade!

Almost every single time I read a middle grade book it makes me question why I don’t read them more often. I love the innocence and fun that happen in books written for younger readers, and this was the PERFECT book to read after ACOWAR.

This book follows Meg Murry who has a family that is a little different than most. She isn’t very academically inclined, her younger brother is too smart for his own good, her twin brothers are kind of rude, her mother is a scientist, and her father has been gone on a government trip for more than 4 years. Meg’s mother starts to explain about tesseracts to her after she finds out about them. Why are they so important, and why is her little brother friends with three old women?

This book was very cute, but I gave this 4/5 stars because there wasn’t very much description. I don’t know if this is just because L’Engle didn’t want to explain too much about the world or if it is just normal for middle grade books to not have much description because kids are more imaginative, but I found it to be the bare minimum of description sometimes. I found it quite annoying because I just wanted to know what everything was like.

I look forward to seeing how the relationship between Calvin and Meg grows, and I’M SO EXCITED FOR THIS MOVIE.

There are so many great actors in this movie, and I love that it’s a mixed race family. I think we need more of that in movies and books. I liked that they didn’t really mention race in this book because it allowed you to imagine who you wanted.

This had many more Christian ideals that I thought would be in it. I didn’t even know this was a Christian book, but I really enjoyed that aspect of it. The fact that the Mrs. Ws were the guardian angels was a nice addition to the story.

Can’t wait to read the rest of the series!

Review: A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses #3) – Sarah J. Maas


A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses #3) – Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #3)

Title: A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses #3)

Author: Sarah J. Maas

Release Date: May 2 2017

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 705

Source: TBR Pile

Looming war threatens all Feyre holds dear in the third volume of the #1 New York Times bestselling A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s manoeuvrings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit – and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords – and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

5 out of 5 stars


I don’t understand how people didn’t like this book. After I write this review I’m going to watch some book review videos on YouTube, because I loved this book!

This was a great continuation of the Court of Thorns and Roses series, and I honestly do not understand why people hated this book so much! Everything wrapped up perfectly and all the characters grew so much.

This beginning of this book follows Feyre in the Spring Court deceiving Tamlin and everyone else in order to get the information she needs to return to the Night Court. First off, that’s such a badass way to start a book. Loved the deception even if it was sad at times. Then she and the rest of the Night Court family have to figure out what to do with the Cauldron situation and how to defeat Hybern and fix literally everything that everyone had messed up…

But this was so good. I do admit, it was VERY slow in the middle. Part two was so slow, but it’s just one of those books you have to get into the groove of reading larger sections at one time and you’re A OK. That being said, I’m all here for the slow burn books. I love when you have to wait to figure everything out. It builds suspense and makes you want to finish it even more. This book did take me quite awhile to read, but I think it’s because I started it and then got distracted because I was home for winter break still and then I took a trip to visit my aunt, uncle, five-year-old cousin, and two newborn twin girls, but I thoroughly enjoyed this nonetheless.

I cannot wait to see what happens in the next book because this was originally supposed to be a trilogy, I think. I need to know what happens with Nesta and Cassian, because their mating bond is going to snap into place any time and everyone knows it. Elain and Lucien are going to have their mating bond situation all figured out and they’re going to be helplessly in love cause AWW.

Also, Amren. I was pissed off when I found out that she was lying to Feyre, but then it all worked out so I’m cool with that. Rhys though.

Oh. My. Gosh. I thought he was actually going to stay dead forever and when Feyre found out that he also made a bargain with a monster I was so shooketh. Because she did the same thing and didn’t tell him and he did the same thing to her because they loved each other so much that they just didn’t want one another to be mad or sad or worried. And Feyre went and found the mirror for the Bone Carver. Excuse me. Cool and so badass.

One of my favorite parts from this book was the whole scene where Feyre goes and summons the Suriel and then it also brings Ianthe and her cronies. SHOOK. I was shook. I loved that Feyre stayed with the Suriel and also led Ianthe and those people to their death, but not before Rhys figured out how to get the Weaver. Man oh man.

I do have to admit that A Court of Mist and Fury was my favorite of the series, but I was not disappointed by the ending of this book at all :)

Series:

A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1)

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses #2)

Review: The Rehearsal – Eleanor Catton


The Rehearsal – Eleanor Catton

The Rehearsal

Title: The Rehearsal

Author: Eleanor Catton

Release Date: May 17, 2008

Publisher: Reagan Arthur Books

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 320

Source: City of Literature Class

All the world’s a stage – and nowhere is it that more true than at an all-girls high school, particularly one where a scandal has just erupted. When news spreads of a high school teacher’s relationship with his underage student, participants and observers alike soon take part in an elaborate show of concern and dismay. But beneath the surface of the teenage girls’ display, there simmers a new awareness of their own power. They obsessively examine the details of the affair with the curiosity, jealousy, and approbation native to any adolescent girl, under the watchful eye of their stern and enigmatic saxophone teacher, whose focus may not be as strictly on their upcoming recital as she implies.

5 out of 5 stars


I loved this book. I was so pleasantly surprised about this and I REALLY want to read more from this author. For my class I had to write a book review about the book, so I’m just going to copy and paste that here…. :)

In Eleanor Catton’s debut novel, The Rehearsal, two storylines are followed that eloquently and seamlessly blend together throughout the novel. Catton, an author from Canada, studied English at the University of Canterbury and completed her Master’s degree in Creative Writing at The Institute of Modern Letters, Victoria University of Wellington. The Rehearsal is Catton’s master’s thesis for her MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa.

The Rehearsal opens with a saxophone teacher talking with a parent about her daughter during music lessons. This conversation quickly unfolds and becomes the basis of the first storyline. During a music lesson with the saxophone teacher the main character, Isolde, is introduced. Isolde makes an excuse about not practicing for her lesson by confiding in her teacher that her older sister, Victoria, was raped by the instrumental music teacher at their high school, Mr. Saladin.

Many of the students that went to school with Victoria and Isolde made it apparent that the relationship between Victoria and Mr. Saladin was consensual. The students claimed to have seen the couple together on multiple occasions, and it is later found out that the two are still seeing each other. Because there was a news story leaked about the inappropriate relations between teacher and student, Isolde and some of Victoria’s friends are required to go to counselling sessions with the school’s guidance counselor to talk about what happened. Isolde meets a girl named Julia at the counselling sessions and they form a friendship.

The second storyline opens with a first-year college student named Stanley auditioning for the Institute for drama. He wants to become an actor, and going to this Institute is his dream. He goes through the audition process and learns that he gets into the school. The first-year drama students have to put on a show with no help from professors, and decide to take the local news story about the relationship between Victoria and Mr. Saladin and turn it into a play.

Isolde and Stanley meet and start dating; Isolde is fifteen and Stanley is eighteen. A few short weeks later Stanley gets called into one of his instructor’s offices and is questioned about his relationship with Isolde. The saxophone teacher saw that the two were forming a relationship and was concerned about Isolde’s safety. Stanley brings it up to Isolde and the two have a fight about it. To try and not make Stanley angrier, she invites her parents to go to the first-year student play with her. Neither she nor her parents know that the play is based off the affair with Victoria and Mr. Saladin. After watching the play, Isolde and Stanley’s families get together to talk about it and its content…

I was pleasantly surprised by this book because the first few chapters were quite slow and confusing with the different stories. While reading the beginning I was distracted by the fact that the language used in conversations was unrealistic. There were too many metaphors and large words to be a real conversation between high schoolers, but as the story progressed, so did the writing style. The Rehearsal has strong themes of sexuality, and there are many references to being lesbian or gay.

The main character Isolde is uncertain about her sexuality and uses Stanley and Julia to experiment to see if she likes men, women, or both genders. The saxophone teacher, who never gets a name throughout the novel, is also represented as lesbian, which put a unique twist on the story which I was not expecting.

The saxophone teacher had fantasies about one of her friends who she has been in love with, and places herself and her female students in her fantasies as well. This reminded me of the relationship between Victoria and Mr. Saladin. I thought it was interesting with different ways Catton used sexuality and intimacy throughout the novel.

Stanley and his fellow first-year students also dealt with sexuality and gender roles during the play they wrote and performed. One of the objectives with the play was to use a prop chosen by last year’s students to use as a main theme or motif to guide the play. The object was a deck of cards, so they spun that into drawing cards at certain points of your life in order to determine sexuality and gender. This was beautifully explained during the brainstorming process of figuring out what to make their play about.

One of my favorite things about this book was the fluidity of time. During the first storyline, the sections were broken up by days of the week, where in the second storyline they were broken up by months. My interpretation of this was that time passes differently at different ages. Because you haven’t experienced much life when you’re young, every single day seems long and monotonous, but as you get older time seems to go faster. It doesn’t seem like you break it up into days or weeks even, but months or periods of your life.

There was also fluidity with time in the sense that some scenes were repeated but from another perspective. Because time was represented differently in both the storylines, there were some discrepancies between when events actually occurred. It gave the reader a sense of knowing more than the characters, and that made the reader want to continue reading to find out when every person would find out information.

The characters in this novel were beautifully broken, and made you want to know everything about them. All the characters were struggling with something different, but didn’t know the best way to deal with their problems. Some of the opinions they brought to the foreground of the story made me really have to think about what I was reading, and how I felt about the issues they were bringing up.

I am extremely impressed with Eleanor Catton as this is her debut novel. The themes that were discussed were talked about eloquently and fit together with the whole story wonderfully. As I read I try and make predictions about the way a story is going to go, and I couldn’t seem do that with this. Every page contained something new and interesting that added to the story. Overall I enjoyed this book immensely, and I look forward to reading more works from Catton in the future.

Review: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic – Alison Bechdel


Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic – Alison Bechdel

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Title: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Author: Alison Bechdel

Release Date: June 8, 2006

Publisher: Mariner

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 234

Source: Bestie

A fresh and brilliantly told memoir from a cult favorite comic artist, marked by gothic twists, a family funeral home, sexual angst, and great books.

This breakout book by Alison Bechdel is a darkly funny family tale, pitch-perfectly illustrated with Bechdel’s sweetly gothic drawings. Like Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, it’s a story exhilaratingly suited to graphic memoir form.

Meet Alison’s father, a historic preservation expert and obsessive restorer of the family’s Victorian home, a third-generation funeral home director, a high school English teacher, an icily distant parent, and a closeted homosexual who, as it turns out, is involved with his male students and a family babysitter. Through narrative that is alternately heartbreaking and fiercely funny, we are drawn into a daughter’s complex yearning for her father. And yet, apart from assigned stints dusting caskets at the family-owned “fun home,” as Alison and her brothers call it, the relationship achieves its most intimate expression through the shared code of books.

When Alison comes out as homosexual herself in late adolescence, the denouement is swift, graphic — and redemptive.

5 out of 5 stars


I was blown away by this comic/graphic memoir. I was really impressed and even though it was not what I was expecting, I’m so glad that I read it.

This memoir follows Alison who is struggling with gender identity and growing up in general. She lives in a broken household with her mother, two brothers, and father who has some unstated issues.

The way that this book was written was so interesting because it jumped back and forth during time which I’ve not experienced with a comic before. It wasn’t confusing at all and I was completely immersed the whole time. The basic plot points are all told within the first 50-100 pages, then it goes back through and gives you key important details. I think that it was a very interesting way of portraying it, but it worked really well.

At the beginning I hated her father. To me he just seemed like a creepy slightly pedophilic man who just wanted young guys, but after reading the whole story you find out that he struggled with his sexuality and his gender identity. Alison and her father end up making amends, but mostly through her recollection of memories of him. It was such an interesting take on a “normal” formatting. Both Alison and her father wanted to be the other gender, so they bonded over that later in life after she came out to her family. He told her some things that had happened in his past that made her relate to him more.

I don’t really understand why Alison’s parents were together in the first place because he’s been gay/transgender his whole life. I don’t know if her mother was in a similar situation, but it ended up “working out” in a sense at the end.

There was amazing representation of anxiety and OCD in this book that I really connected with. I used to have anxiety through elementary and middle school and that derived from my need for perfection. I am fairly certain that I dealt with OCD, but didn’t know what it was called and was never formally diagnosed with it. But I remember feeling so similarly to Alison during these parts of the book. I know what it’s like to need to do things a certain way in a certain order. Or making sure my objects in my room didn’t “feel” like one was preferred over the other. It sounds strange to people who haven’t dealt with it, but it made total and complete sense to me.

I would highly highly highly recommend this book to anyone, especially if you’ve dealt with similar situations as Alison or members of her family. Even if you’re not huge into comics or graphic memoirs, give it a try!!

Review: On the Merits of Unnaturalness (The Bone Season) – Samantha Shannon


On the Merits of Unnaturalness (The Bone Season) – Samantha Shannon

On the Merits of Unnaturalness

Title: On the Merits of Unnaturalness

Author: Samantha Shannon

Release Date: January 25, 2015

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Format: eBook

Page Number: 37

Source: TBR

Be aware, my good Reader, that this Pamphlet, no matter how controversial its content, must never fall into enemy Hands.

The most important piece of clairvoyant literature written in the twenty-first century, On the Merits of Unnaturalness is a pamphlet first published anonymously in 2031 by Jaxon Hall, the voyant who would later become the mime-lord known as the White Binder.

Hall was the first to index both known and supposed forms of Unnaturalness, resulting in the classification of the Seven Orders. This controversial piece of literature spread across the voyant underworld like a plague, revolutionising the syndicate but also creating discord in the form of brutal gang wars between the newly-divided categories, the scars of which can still be seen today.

3 out of 5 stars


This information was good to know, but it was totally not necessary to The Bone Season story. This is the pamphlet that Jaxon writes in the series, and the whole time I could ONLY think of how angry I am at him for other things… ugh.

I was kind of bored while reading this, but I do think it was valuable information. This novella just described the seven levels of clairvoyance in this world. There were some references to the 1980s which was funny because in the series it’s 2059, so to them the 1980s was forever ago. I just thought it was comical. There were little snippets that were funny, but I did think that Jaxon dwelled on his order the most. Obviously he knew the most information about that because he was writing from his own experience, but it made it a little suspicious.

There’s not much to say about this, but my piece of advice would be to not spend the $2 on this ebook.

Series:

The Pale Dreamer (The Bone Season #0.5)

The Bone Season (The Bone Season #1)

The Mime Order (The Bone Season #2)

The Song Rising (The Bone Season #3)

Review: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) – Erika Johansen


The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) – Erika Johansen

The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling, #1)

Title: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1)

Author: Erika Johansen

Release Date: April 14, 2015

Publisher: Harper Paperbacks

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 464

Source: TBR Pile

Magic, adventure, mystery, and romance combine in this epic debut in which a young princess must reclaim her dead mother’s throne, learn to be a ruler—and defeat the Red Queen, a powerful and malevolent sorceress determined to destroy her.

On her nineteenth birthday, Princess Kelsea Raleigh Glynn, raised in exile, sets out on a perilous journey back to the castle of her birth to ascend her rightful throne. Plain and serious, a girl who loves books and learning, Kelsea bears little resemblance to her mother, the vain and frivolous Queen Elyssa. But though she may be inexperienced and sheltered, Kelsea is not defenseless: Around her neck hangs the Tearling sapphire, a jewel of immense magical power; and accompanying her is the Queen’s Guard, a cadre of brave knights led by the enigmatic and dedicated Lazarus. Kelsea will need them all to survive a cabal of enemies who will use every weapon—from crimson-caped assassins to the darkest blood magic—to prevent her from wearing the crown.

Despite her royal blood, Kelsea feels like nothing so much as an insecure girl, a child called upon to lead a people and a kingdom about which she knows almost nothing. But what she discovers in the capital will change everything, confronting her with horrors she never imagined. An act of singular daring will throw Kelsea’s kingdom into tumult, unleashing the vengeance of the tyrannical ruler of neighboring Mortmesne: the Red Queen, a sorceress possessed of the darkest magic. Now Kelsea will begin to discover whom among the servants, aristocracy, and her own guard she can trust.

But the quest to save her kingdom and meet her destiny has only just begun—a wondrous journey of self-discovery and a trial by fire that will make her a legend . . . if she can survive.

This book will be a beautifully designed package with illustrated endpapers, a map of the Tearling, and a ribbon marker.

3 out of 5 stars


I’m kind of torn between giving this 3 stars and giving this 4 stars, but I don’t do half stars…. I really liked the last half of this, but the beginning was so so so slow. I listened to this on audio and read it in physical format because I wanted to read while driving. I kind of wish that I could have listened to the second half on the car ride because it was much more exciting, but such is life.

This book followed Kelsea who is now the Queen of the Tearling, as the title suggests. She has been living in solitude with her guardians for 19 years, and she’s taken away on her 19th birthday to become the Queen. She’s always known this was how it had to be, but she still wasn’t as prepared as she thought she should have been. Her mother was known for poor decisions, but Kelsea wasn’t told about her failures. She lived a sheltered life with lots of academic classes and always thrived in the stories she got to read from the fiction books in her house.

I really love the premise for this book, but I don’t think it was executed as well as it could have been. If I were to rate the first quarter of this book I probably would have given it a 2 stars, but by the end I was feeling 4 stars. I don’t know. There were quite a few issues about this book that I wasn’t fond of.

There was an instalove situation that pissed me off. So first off. Kelsea has never seen a large group of people in her life, so why the hell would she be able to be in love with someone. Also, how would she know how to flirt well? Umm. She wouldn’t. The only man she had ever been exposed to was Barty, her father figure. Hmm. I hate instalove, and I couldn’t appreciate the love because it felt so rushed.

I also didn’t like that there was so much unknown to the reader. I’m all for figuring out as you go, but I like when you know a little more than the characters know. I like being one step ahead, but it always felt as if you were dragging behind. Not a fan of that at all.

It was cool because by the end you got to see a little of the power with the sapphire necklaces, but you only got a taste, so you want more. Clever. I’m impressed with your miniature cliff hangers, Ms. Johansen.

Overall I think this was a good book. I’m interested to see what happens in the next ones. I definitely recommend audiobooks in general because I think I’ve fallen in love.

Review: Tricks (Tricks #1) – Ellen Hopkins


Tricks (Tricks #1) – Ellen Hopkins

Tricks (Tricks, #1)

Title: Tricks (Tricks #1)

Author: Ellen Hopkins

Release Date: August 25, 2009

Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 627

Source: TBR Pile

Five teenagers from different parts of the country. Three girls. Two guys. Four straight. One gay. Some rich. Some poor. Some from great families. Some with no one at all. All living their lives as best they can, but all searching…for freedom, safety, community, family, love. What they don’t expect, though, is all that can happen when those powerful little words “I love you” are said for all the wrong reasons.

Five moving stories remain separate at first, then interweave to tell a larger, powerful story — a story about making choices, taking leaps of faith, falling down, and growing up. A story about kids figuring out what sex and love are all about, at all costs, while asking themselves, “Can I ever feel okay about myself?”

2 out of 5 stars


If you would have asked me what I would have rated this book about halfway through I might have said 5 stars, but the ending just fricked me up and I really didn’t enjoy it.

This story is about five teenagers; they all get caught up with people and say “I love you” and bad things happen.

There were LOTS of triggers in this book, so if you’re sensitive to rape, sex, drugs, alcohol, dysfunctional family units, parents dying, gambling, or prostitution, DO NOT READ THIS.

I don’t typically read books like this. Ellen Hopkins is the only author that I read about drugs, but I did not like this book very much! It was kind of confusing having 5 different perspectives. All the girls seemed so similar to me, and there were three of them. It was hard for me to separate them.

I honestly don’t even know how to review this because there was so much that happened, but none of it plot driven at all. I’ll give it a shot, I guess.

All these teenagers are desperate to find love. The gay boy lives on a farm with his father and basically gets banished from his home. One is a typical preacher’s daughter who ends up being kind of promiscuous. One girl has a broken family unit where her mother gets paid to let men rape her. One girl lives in the shadow of her older sister. And one boy has a problem with gambling and drugs.

The characters don’t even all meet up in the end. What the heck. I was waiting for some dramatic meet up situation and for everyone to figure out their lives together, but no. There was a brief meet up situation with two of the girls, but it was in very sad circumstances.

Ugh. I really did not enjoy this because of the last half. Ellen Hopkins has such a beautiful and intoxicating way to write that just pulls you in, but damn I didn’t like the content.

There was so much sex. So much unnecessary sex. After reading the little informational thing at the back, it talked about how her goal for this was to highlight the issue of child prostitution in the United States, so I get it, I guess. But there were pretty explicit sex scenes to claim this is a YA novel.

I’m 18 and I was still disturbed by it, I don’t even know what I would have done if I read this when I was 13 or 14. I read Perks of Being a Wallflower in early middle school and was traumatized…

I don’t know, honestly. Only read this if you’re not super triggered by what I listed above.